books0977:

The Chess Players (1929). Sir John Lavery (Irish, 1856‑1941). Oil on canvas. Tate.
The picture shows the Hon. Margaret and the Hon. Rosemary Scott-Ellis, daughters of Thomas Scott-Ellis, 8th Baron Howard de Walden. The girls have put aside their books for a game a chess, perhaps at Chirk Castle, Denbighshire, where the Scott-Ellis family lived for years.

books0977:

The Chess Players (1929). Sir John Lavery (Irish, 1856‑1941). Oil on canvas. Tate.

The picture shows the Hon. Margaret and the Hon. Rosemary Scott-Ellis, daughters of Thomas Scott-Ellis, 8th Baron Howard de Walden. The girls have put aside their books for a game a chess, perhaps at Chirk Castle, Denbighshire, where the Scott-Ellis family lived for years.

books0977:

Bette Franke reading. Time After Time. Porter magazine’s Fall issue. A chic lazy day for the Dutch model. Photographer: David Bellemere. Stylist: Ondine Azoulay.
With advice such as “a sprinkling of crystal or an alignment of pearls gives a glamorous punctuation to sharp silhouettes,” Porter’s latest fashion feature stars Dutch model Franke in and around, the grounds of a stately home.

books0977:

Bette Franke reading. Time After Time. Porter magazine’s Fall issue. A chic lazy day for the Dutch model. Photographer: David Bellemere. Stylist: Ondine Azoulay.

With advice such as “a sprinkling of crystal or an alignment of pearls gives a glamorous punctuation to sharp silhouettes,” Porter’s latest fashion feature stars Dutch model Franke in and around, the grounds of a stately home.

books0977:

Arrow Collar Man (circa 1920-1929). J.C. (Joseph Christian) Leyendecker (1874-1951). Illustrator and entrepreneur. He painted strong, athletic, men and lithe, feminine, women with equal ease. Inspired Norman Rockwell. Created long-running characters like Saturday Evening Post babies and the Arrow collar man. 

books0977:

Arrow Collar Man (circa 1920-1929). J.C. (Joseph Christian) Leyendecker (1874-1951).

Illustrator and entrepreneur. He painted strong, athletic, men and lithe, feminine, women with equal ease. Inspired Norman Rockwell. Created long-running characters like Saturday Evening Post babies and the Arrow collar man. 

“Send me a man who reads!”

DO YOU THINK reading is more important at the beginning of your career or later on? Here’s what International Paper’s latest research study revealed.

We studied the reading habits of 100 young businessmen who are members of management training programs and are considered likely to become executives. We found that these men read an average of 3 magazines and 12 newspapers a week.

Then we conducted an identical survey among 100 company vice presidents between the ages of 45 and 50. In a single week, these busy men read an average of 3½ magazines and 15 newspapers. The conclusion is as clear as print:

Successful executives keep on reading.

Americans in every field are becoming acutely aware of the impact reading can have on their lives. And worthwhile reading is not confined to books, magazines and newspapers.

A little item buried deep in an annual report gives you a big new idea. An insurance mailing piece gets you started on a retirement plan. A political leaflet sparks your interest in the local election.

There are also thousands of government pamphlets. They cover an extraordinary range of interests. For a pamphlet on almost any subject, write the U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. You’ll get the advice of experts—probably for less than the price of a package of cigarettes.

Reading is contagious—your children can catch it from you

Here’s how you can develop the reading habit for yourself and your family.

One: Start off in a small way. Just fifteen minutes a day. Soon you’ll be reading an hour a day.

Two: Make sure there are comfortable chairs, good lamps and at least one quiet place to read in your home.

Three: Take care to select worthwhile books. The better the books you and your family read, the more you will enjoy reading.

Free. Write Box 14, Education Department, International Paper, 22 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y., for free reprints of this advertisement.
© International Paper Company 1961


INTERNATIONAL PAPER

Manufacturers of papers for magazines, books, newspapers . papers for home and office use . converting papers . papers and paperboards for packaging . labels . folding cartons . milk containers . shipping containers . multiwall bags . grocery and specialty bags and sacks . pulps for industry . lumber, plywood and building materials


471—International Paper Send Me A Man Who Reads

erikkwakkel:

Hidden Book
This unusual shot I took some time ago when I visited the Abbey of Rolduc, in the south of the Netherlands. While my finger carefully lifts the loose cover of a sixteenth-century printed book, you are shown the inside of the binding, where the backs of the quires are held together by a horizontal strip of parchment. What so special about this scene is the fact that this strip was cut from a handwritten medieval manuscript - old-fashioned and therefore ideal for cutting up and recycling, binders thought. And so this early-fifteenth-century handwritten Dutch Bible found itself being sliced and diced. “I loved once,” the exposed text reads with a flair of irony and tragedy (Ic hebbe gheminnet). My finger allowed the strip to peek at the world again for the first time in centuries: that thought alone makes research of these fragments a thrilling activity.
Pic (my own): Rolduc Abbey, printed book in the attic library. More on fragments in this blog post.

erikkwakkel:

Hidden Book

This unusual shot I took some time ago when I visited the Abbey of Rolduc, in the south of the Netherlands. While my finger carefully lifts the loose cover of a sixteenth-century printed book, you are shown the inside of the binding, where the backs of the quires are held together by a horizontal strip of parchment. What so special about this scene is the fact that this strip was cut from a handwritten medieval manuscript - old-fashioned and therefore ideal for cutting up and recycling, binders thought. And so this early-fifteenth-century handwritten Dutch Bible found itself being sliced and diced. “I loved once,” the exposed text reads with a flair of irony and tragedy (Ic hebbe gheminnet). My finger allowed the strip to peek at the world again for the first time in centuries: that thought alone makes research of these fragments a thrilling activity.

Pic (my own): Rolduc Abbey, printed book in the attic library. More on fragments in this blog post.

dianejreed:

Step inside…

dianejreed:

Step inside…

dianejreed:

Take the journey…

dianejreed:

Take the journey…

Rules for Reading

Memo grabbed from the sublime Roger Green. Thanks, as always, Rog.

1. Always stop at the end of a chapter. Always.

No; I will if I am getting sleepy or have something urgent to attend to, but otherwise, if it’s a good read, full steam ahead.

2. Use specific bookmarks.

I hate to admit it, but yes, preferably. At one point I had a stack of ten or so on my nightstand, but since we moved in July I have not seen them, so I’ve been using whatever is close to hand.

2a. No dog-earing, bending, or folding of pages.

I hate this practice with a passion. My late sister did it with everything she read; consequently, I never loaned her any of my books.

2b. Weirdly enough, spine-breaking is fine, just don’t get too crazy with it.

Like Batman, I prefer my spines unbroken, but I am not fanatical about it, especially with mass-market paperbacks.

3. Always read two books at once.

Well, it’s not mandatory, but unlike my wife, I will read multiple books at once. I’ve had as many as five or six going at the same time, and that always baffles her.

4. No (or minimal) writing in books.

I am not someone who underlines or writes in books, although I do find it interesting seeing what other people have underlined or highlighted in used or library books. I do have a lot of signed books, but I assume that’s not what we’re talking about here.

5. Rereads must be earned because there are too many great books out there to read an okay one twice.

Books must reward re-reading, to my way of thinking. I’ve read Lolita five or six times and find new wonders in it every time. Even some of Peter David’s Star Trek novels have lured me back for a second read, though.

6. Not finishing a book is okay.

To me, it’s mandatory, if the book is no good. Why compound the error of buying or borrowing it by wasting time reading it, if it has nothing to nourish or inform the soul?

7. It is always better to take more books on a trip than you think you’ll possibly have time to read.

Yes. Yes, it is. I did just that on my recent trip to Orlando. I just started the second of the two books I brought, and I’ve been back a month. I’ve been busy lately.

8. Having a favorite genre is fine. Getting stuck in that genre is bad.

I would agree with that, although I tend to explore genres in phases. My teenage years were spent reading science fiction like Heinlein, Asimov and Le Guin; a few years back I read pretty much every Hard Case Crime novel I could lay hands on.

9. Reading on a tablet is still reading.

That’s pretty obvious, isn’t it? In this day and age, we have separated the act from its previously-exclusive medium. The Long Emergency may cause us to revert back to more traditional modes of experiencing art and information, but until then, reading is reading.