slightlyignorant:

Artist: Gloria Pizzilli
bookmania:

Need cash for book-friends? Click here! (via afilmandlitlover)
The Booksmith adds:

No, but they can be both explosive and incendiary.

The Booksmith adds:

No, but they can be both explosive and incendiary.

teachingliteracy:

(by josephnewton)
womenreading:

(by kendime caylar)



The Booksmith added:

Books make the best traveling companions.

womenreading:

(by kendime caylar)

The Booksmith added: Books make the best traveling companions.

youngadultatbooktopia:

“Picking five favorite books is like picking the five body parts you’d most like not to lose.”Neil Gaiman

smithsonianmag:

That “Old Book Smell” Is a Mix of Grass and Vanilla
By Colin Schultz
Photo: David Flores
Smell is chemistry, and the chemistry of old books gives your cherished tomes their scent. As a book ages, the chemical compounds used—the glue, the paper, the ink–begin to break down. And, as they do, they release volatile compounds—the source of the smell. A common smell of old books, says the International League for Antiquarian Booksellers, is a hint of vanilla: “Lignin, which is present in all wood-based paper, is closely related to vanillin. As it breaks down, the lignin grants old books that faint vanilla scent.”
A study in 2009 looked into the smell of old books, finding that the complex scent was a mix of “hundreds of so-called volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released into the air from the paper,” says the Telegraph. Here’s how Matija Strlic, the lead scientist behind that study, described the smell of an old book:

A combination of grassy notes with a tang of acids and a hint of vanilla over an underlying mustiness, this unmistakable smell is as much a part of the book as its contents.

Ed note: What makes rain smell so good?

smithsonianmag:

That “Old Book Smell” Is a Mix of Grass and Vanilla

By Colin Schultz

Photo: David Flores

Smell is chemistry, and the chemistry of old books gives your cherished tomes their scent. As a book ages, the chemical compounds used—the glue, the paper, the ink–begin to break down. And, as they do, they release volatile compounds—the source of the smell. A common smell of old books, says the International League for Antiquarian Booksellers, is a hint of vanilla: “Lignin, which is present in all wood-based paper, is closely related to vanillin. As it breaks down, the lignin grants old books that faint vanilla scent.”

A study in 2009 looked into the smell of old books, finding that the complex scent was a mix of “hundreds of so-called volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released into the air from the paper,” says the Telegraph. Here’s how Matija Strlic, the lead scientist behind that study, described the smell of an old book:

A combination of grassy notes with a tang of acids and a hint of vanilla over an underlying mustiness, this unmistakable smell is as much a part of the book as its contents.